describe the cult from the outside

cult (n)
1610s, “worship,” also “a particular form of worship,” from French culte (17c.), from Latin cultus “care, labor; cultivation, culture; worship, reverence,” originally “tended, cultivated,” past participle of colere “to till” (see colony). Rare after 17c.; revived mid-19c. with reference to ancient or primitive rituals. Meaning “a devotion to a person or thing” is from 1829.

Cult. An organized group of people, religious or not, with whom you disagree. [Rawson]

the cult is not a cult, it is the cult.

culture (n.)
mid-15c., “the tilling of land,” from Middle French culture and directly from Latin cultura “a cultivating, agriculture,” figuratively “care, culture, an honoring,” from past participle stem of colere “to tend, guard; to till, cultivate” (see colony). The figurative sense of “cultivation through education” is first attested c. 1500. Meaning “the intellectual side of civilization” is from 1805; that of “collective customs and achievements of a people” is from 1867.

For without culture or holiness, which are always the gift of a very few, a man may renounce wealth or any other external thing, but he cannot renounce hatred, envy, jealousy, revenge. Culture is the sanctity of the intellect. [William Butler Yeats]

Slang culture vulture is from 1947. Culture shock first recorded 1940. Ironic or contemptuous spelling kulchur is attested from 1940 (Pound), and compare kultur.

puericulture (n.)
“science of bringing up healthy children,” including prenatal care, 1887, from French puériculture (A. Caron, 1866), from Latin puer “boy, child” (see puerility) + cultura “cultivation” (see culture).

agriculture (n.)
mid-15c., “tillage, cultivation of large areas of land to provide food,” from Late Latin agricultura “cultivation of the land,” a contraction of agri cultura “cultivation of land,” from agri, genitive of ager “a field” (see acre) + cultura “cultivation” (see culture (n.)). In Old English, the idea could be expressed by eorðtilþ.

cultural (adj.)
1868, in reference to the raising of plants or animals, from Latin cultura “tillage” (see culture) + -al (1). In reference to the cultivation of the mind, from 1875; hence, “relating to civilization or a civilization.” A fertile starter-word among anthropologists and sociologists, for example cultural diffusion, in use by 1912; cultural diversity by 1935; cultural imperialism by 1937; cultural pluralism by 1932; cultural relativism by 1948.

nudism (n.)
1929, from French nudisme (see nude + -ism). Nudist “one who practices nudism” appeared at the same time.

Made in Germany, imported to France, is the cult of Nudism, a mulligan stew of vegetarianism, physical culture and pagan worship. [“Time,” July 1, 1929]

Mulligan (n.)
surname, from Gaelic Maolagan, Old Irish Maelecan, a double diminutive of mael “bald,” hence “the little bald (or shaven) one,” probably often a reference to a monk or disciple. As “stew made with whatever’s available,” 1904, hobo slang, probably from a proper name. The golf sense of “extra stroke after a poor shot” (1949) is sometimes said to be from the name of a Canadian golfer in the 1920s whose friends gave him an extra shot in gratitude for driving them over rough roads to their weekly foursome at St. Lambert Country Club near Montreal.

hobo (n.)
“a tramp,” 1889, Western U.S., of unknown origin. Barnhart compares early 19c. English dialectal hawbuck “lout, clumsy fellow, country bumpkin.” Or possibly from ho, boy, a workers’ call on late 19c. western U.S. railroads. Facetious formation hobohemia, “community or life of hobos,” is from 1923 (see bohemian).

the question has been asked whether the cult is comprised of hobohemia and hedgewitchery or if all outside the cult are comprised of hobohemia and hedgewitchery.

the cult does ask for definition, the cult does ask for legitimacy, the cult does not ask whatsoever.  the cult does not need identity or legimization.  the cult is not a  cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is no ta cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult, the cult is not a nult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult, the cult is not a cult,l the cult is not a cult, the culti is not a cult, the cult is not a cult a cult, the clut is not a cult, the culatisnot acultthecultisnotaculttheculisnotacultthecultisnotaculthtcultisnotacultthecultisnotacultthecultisnotacultthecultisnotacultthecultisnot a cultithecultisnotancultithecultisnotaculthtecultisnotaculttheicultisnotacultthecultisnotacultthecultiisnotacultthecultisnotacultithecultisnotacultithecultisnotacultthecbulctisnotacultthecultisnotacultthecultisnotacultthecultis snot a cult the cult is not a cult the cult is not a cult the cult is not a culta direct aberation of soul from its stated intent from the dearth of hell to the pristine ascendance of heaven comes abhorrence of nature sequenced fniited finiteeeeeeeee revelation tantatmount revelation pursuent to motherhood and progeny manigest forseen grim nature crimson tide gaping wound forgetfulness in admonishment to forgotten songs and tapestries of storied nightmareish weabers gaping wound tapestried nightmares wounding fogtten tapestries of nightmares olong storied fogeotten sotried nightmares wonderment in miracled zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzis it happy or sad is it happy sad is it happy or sad is it happy or sad is it happy or sad there is no difference break the barriers of linguistics brea the barriers of lingiistics all is one all is one all is one break the barriers of linguistics break the barriers of linguistics all is one all is one

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